The Ethics of Mozi: Social Organization and Impartial Care

Mozi 墨翟

Author: Henrique Schneider Categories: Chinese Philosophy, Ethics, Social and Political Philosophy Word count: 994 Mo Di, or Mozi[1], (墨子, c. 470 – c. 391 BCE) is the founding figure of Mohism, a philosophical, social, and self-defense movement during the Warring States era (479–221 BCE) in China. Mohism, as much of early Chinese philosophy, ties ethics … Continue reading The Ethics of Mozi: Social Organization and Impartial Care

Condorcet’s Jury Theorem and Democracy

A fresco by Cesare Maccari (1840-1919 CE) depicting Roman senator Cicero (106-43 BCE) denouncing the conspirator Catiline in the Roman senate.

Author: Robert Weston Siscoe Category: Social and Political Philosophy Word Count: 999 Suppose that a majority of jurors decide that a defendant is guilty (or not), and we want to know the likelihood that they reached the correct verdict. The French philosopher Marquis de Condorcet (1743-1794) showed that we can get a mathematically precise answer, … Continue reading Condorcet’s Jury Theorem and Democracy

What Is Misogyny?

Shepard Fairey's 2017 Triptych: "We the People: Greater Than Fear, Defend Dignity, & Protect Each Other"

Authors: Odelia Zuckerman and Clair Morrissey Categories: Philosophy of Sex and Gender, Ethics, Social and Political Philosophy, Philosophy of Race Word count: 998 The term misogyny[1] refers to systems that uphold gender-based oppression against women and girls. What those systems are, and how they operate, is a subject of philosophical debate. Here we explain two … Continue reading What Is Misogyny?

Why be Moral? Plato’s ‘Ring of Gyges’ Thought Experiment

The Ring of Gyges.

Author: Spencer Case Categories: Ethics, Social and Political Philosophy, Historical Philosophy Word count: 995 What if you could steal, cheat, and violate any other moral norm without fear of punishment? Would you still have reason to do what’s right? The ancient Greek philosopher Plato (427—347 B.C.E.) considered this question in his dialogue, the Republic, which … Continue reading Why be Moral? Plato’s ‘Ring of Gyges’ Thought Experiment