The Fine-Tuning Argument for the Existence of God

Photo from Astronaut Alexander Gerst Aboard The International Space Station

Author: Thomas Metcalf Category: Philosophy of Religion Word count: 987 Here’s a simple experiment to help test whether God exists: Hold a refrigerator magnet about one inch above a paperclip. If the magnet picks up the paperclip, then that tiny magnet was able to overcome the gravity of an entire planet.[1] How might this provide … Continue reading The Fine-Tuning Argument for the Existence of God

Leibniz’s Principle of Sufficient Reason

Author: Marc Bobro Category: Historical Philosophy, Metaphysics, Philosophy of Religion Word count: 999 Imagine that your bicycle keeps dropping its chain. Annoyed, you take it to a bike shop to determine the cause in order to fix the problem. The mechanic informs you that the problem cannot be fixed because there is no reason why … Continue reading Leibniz’s Principle of Sufficient Reason

Design Arguments for the Existence of God

Photo from Astronaut Alexander Gerst Aboard The International Space Station

Author: Thomas Metcalf Category: Philosophy of Religion Word count: 990 The universe, or some of the objects in it, exhibit order, complexity, efficiency, and perhaps purpose. Many everyday objects with those features—e.g., watches and houses—were intentionally designed. Should we conclude, therefore, that some of the “natural” objects in the universe, or the universe itself, was … Continue reading Design Arguments for the Existence of God

“God is dead”: Nietzsche and the Death of God

Nietzsche

Author: Justin Remhof Categories: Phenomenology and Existentialism; Philosophy of Religion; Ethics; Historical Philosophy Word Count: 985 Nietzsche is perhaps most famous for making the striking claim that God is dead. He writes, “God is dead! God remains dead! And we have killed him!” (GS 125). What does this mean? Straightforwardly, it seems nonsensical. God is supposed to be eternal, … Continue reading “God is dead”: Nietzsche and the Death of God

The Ontological Argument for the Existence of God

Anselm

Author: Andrew Chapman Category: Philosophy of Religion Word Count: 1000 1. God’s Greatness The Abrahamic conception of God is that he’s awesome—all-powerful, all-knowing, all-good, creator of the universe, self-existent, and a host of other properties that make him not just very, very great, but the greatest that there is or could possibly be. “This is … Continue reading The Ontological Argument for the Existence of God

The Problem of Evil

Author: Thomas Metcalf Category: Philosophy of Religion Word Count: 1000 Many people believe in God and understand God to be an omnipotent (all-powerful), omniscient (all-knowing), and morally perfect being.[1] But the world contains quite a lot of evil or badness: intense suffering, premature death, and moral wickedness. This inspires some questions: Why would God permit … Continue reading The Problem of Evil

Because God Says So: On Divine Command Theory

Author: Spencer Case Category: Ethics, Philosophy of Religion Word Count: 1000 Assuming God exists, what is the relationship between God's commands and morality? Assuming that God is morally perfect and so commands all and only good things, we may distinguish between two claims: a.   God commands what He does because it is good. b. … Continue reading Because God Says So: On Divine Command Theory

Can We Believe in Miracles?

Author: Tomás Bogardus Category: Philosophy of Religion Word Count: 1000 True story: My friend’s daughter failed a hearing test when she was two years old, and was subsequently  diagnosed with a rare hearing disorder. The doctors recommended a battery of follow-up tests and procedures, both expensive and invasive. My friend was, of course, crushed by the … Continue reading Can We Believe in Miracles?