Classical Syllogisms

The traditional "square of opposition."

Author: Timothy Eshing Category: Logic and Reasoning, Historical Philosophy Word Count: 999 Consider this argument: All humans are mammals. All mammals are animals. Therefore, all humans are animals. It’s an example of a classical syllogism. The logic of syllogisms, which are special kinds of deductive arguments, was famously discussed by the ancient Greek philosopher Aristotle … Continue reading Classical Syllogisms

Philosophy of Space and Time: What is Space?

Samuel Clarke and Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz.

Categories: Metaphysics, Philosophy of Science, Historical Philosophy Author: Dan Peterson Word Count: 999 Imagine that every object in the universe – you, your chair, Earth, everything else – moved one meter to your left. Would you notice a difference? Facts about relative distances, like how far my chair is from me, would remain the same … Continue reading Philosophy of Space and Time: What is Space?

The Ethics of Mozi: Social Organization and Impartial Care

Mozi 墨翟

Author: Henrique Schneider Categories: Chinese Philosophy, Ethics, Social and Political Philosophy Word count: 994 Mo Di, or Mozi[1], (墨子, c. 470 – c. 391 BCE) is the founding figure of Mohism, a philosophical, social, and self-defense movement during the Warring States era (479–221 BCE) in China. Mohism, as much of early Chinese philosophy, ties ethics … Continue reading The Ethics of Mozi: Social Organization and Impartial Care

G. E. M. Anscombe’s “Modern Moral Philosophy”

Gertrude Elizabeth Margaret Anscombe

Author: Daniel Weltman Category: Ethics, Historical Philosophy Word Count: 1000 When discussing morality, we often talk about what we ought to do: e.g., “you ought not to cheat on that test” or “you shouldn’t steal candy from a baby.” The philosopher Gertrude Elizabeth Margaret Anscombe (1919-2001) argues in her article "Modern Moral Philosophy" (1958) that … Continue reading G. E. M. Anscombe’s “Modern Moral Philosophy”

Why be Moral? Plato’s ‘Ring of Gyges’ Thought Experiment

The Ring of Gyges.

Author: Spencer Case Categories: Ethics, Social and Political Philosophy, Historical Philosophy Word count: 995 What if you could steal, cheat, and violate any other moral norm without fear of punishment? Would you still have reason to do what’s right? The ancient Greek philosopher Plato (427—347 B.C.E.) considered this question in his dialogue, the Republic, which … Continue reading Why be Moral? Plato’s ‘Ring of Gyges’ Thought Experiment