Wu-Wei: Acting without Desire

Cook Ding Cuts Up an Ox

Author: Henrique Schneider Categories: Chinese Philosophy, Historical Philosophy Word Count: 997 Wu-wei (無爲, wúwéi) is a central concept in early Chinese philosophy. However, different schools of thought conceptualized the notion differently, so it is difficult to briefly capture its multiple senses and uses. Our focus here will be on one sense of wu-wei in the … Continue reading Wu-Wei: Acting without Desire

How to Establish Social Order? Three Early Chinese Answers

Author: Henrique Schneider Categories: Chinese Philosophy, Historical Philosophy, Social and Political Philosophy, Ethics Word Count: 998 Way, Chaos, and Order are central to (early) Chinese philosophy. The Way is not a metaphor, but a natural structure to be uncovered by thinking and action. Chaos happens when people do not find a Way. Not finding a … Continue reading How to Establish Social Order? Three Early Chinese Answers

Mengzi’s Moral Psychology, Part 2: The Cultivation Analogy

Mencius's Well by Helen De Cruz

Author:  John Ramsey Categories: Historical Philosophy, Ethics, Chinese Philosophy Word Count:  959 Editor’s Note: This essay is the second in a two-part series authored by John on the topic of Mengzi’s moral psychology. The first essay is here. In the first part on Mengzi’s moral psychology, we explored his claim that all people have four … Continue reading Mengzi’s Moral Psychology, Part 2: The Cultivation Analogy

Mengzi’s Moral Psychology, Part 1: The Four Moral Sprouts

Author:  John Ramsey Categories: Historical Philosophy, Ethics, Chinese Philosophy Word Count: 988 Editor’s Note: This essay is the first in a two-part series authored by John on the topic of Mengzi’s moral psychology. The second essay is here. Mengzi (372–289 BCE), or Mencius,[1] an early Confucian whose thinking is represented in the eponymous Mengzi,[2] argues … Continue reading Mengzi’s Moral Psychology, Part 1: The Four Moral Sprouts